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20131202
20131210
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the letters of various democratic candidates started with adelaide stevenson and jfk and bill clinton and mondale they all turned to him as a liberal conscience to appeal to the liberal constituency. >> of hard headed a liberal is some -- liberalism but he did not make the transition to kennedy overnight. can you talk about that transition from libertyville to intelsat? >> to use the word hard-headed that is interesting. he adored stevenson did worked for him twice through two presidential elections as a speechwriter but at the same time he felt stevenson was passive on the issue of civil rights. as tom points out that he tried to urge stephen said to protect the black voting rights to the issue of desegregation with the supreme court decision although very much a liberal idealist could not take positions that would possibly upset his presidential ambitions. said the way he related to john kennedy he felt it incumbent on his role as political adviser. >> he called up to call kennedy. >> the other thing is very closely i think it is the first or reference to write about bobby after his
candidates starting with adelaide stevenson and john f. kennedy and people, bill clinton, walter mondale, i can list practically every presidential candidate on the democratic ticket for those 60 years, they all turned to him because they realized he was kind of serving as a kind of liberal conscience to that generation of political people. and the a way they needed -- in a way they needed his validation to be able to appeal to the liberal constituency that he tended to represent. >> but a hard-headed kind of liberalism. >> that's right. >> which is where -- he was so close to stevenson and did not make the transition to kennedy overnight. could you talk about that transition to shift from libertyville to hyannis? >> well, that's very interesting because you used the word hardheaded. he was very disappointed -- he, obviously, adored stevenson, e worked for him twice. but be at the same time, he felt that stevenson seemed rather passive on the issue of civil rights. and he was very, as tom points out, he had woken to that issue from having that visit in the mid 1940s to the south. and he tri
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2